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Events

Crossing Guard Appreciation Ceremony on Monday, November 13

October 23, 2017

I’m proud to host a Crossing Guard Appreciation Ceremony on Monday, November 13th at 5:30pm. Please come to the 6th floor of Local 372 at 125 Barclay Street (Corner of Westside Highway) to help show our appreciation for the people who keep our children safe every day!

Events

Delivering the Commencement Address at my former high school, Masconomet Regional

June 5, 2017

I was honored to deliver the commencement address at the 2017 graduation ceremony of my high school, Masconomet Regional High School. In addition to my own experiences as a high school student, I spoke about being of service, being compassionate, that facts matter, resisting and being a generation that helps lead in changing our country for the better.

Events

TIPS FOR BEATING THE HEAT

July 7, 2016

Friends,

As the summer heat picks up, it is important that we take precautions to ensure our safety and the safety of our neighbors.

To help New Yorkers beat the heat, New York City has opened cooling centers around the five boroughs, including at senior centers, NYCHA facilities, and parks. Call 311 or go to nyc.gov/beattheheat to find the nearest center, including accessible facilities.

SAFETY TIPS

  • Stay out of the sun and avoid extreme temperature changes.
  • Never leave your children or pets in the car
  • Avoid strenuous activity, especially during the sun’s peak hours: 11:00 am to 4:00 pm. If you must do strenuous activity, do it during the coolest part of the day: 4:00 am to 7:00 am.
  • Wear lightweight, light-colored clothing.
  • Drink fluids, particularly water, even if you do not feel thirsty. Your body needs water to keep cool. Those on fluid-restricted diets or taking diuretics should first consult their physician.
  • Avoid beverages containing alcohol and/or caffeine.
  • If possible, go to an air-conditioned building for several hours during the hottest parts of the day.
  • Eat small, frequent meals.
  • Participate in activities that will keep you cool, like going to the movies, shopping at a mall, or swimming at a pool or beach.
  • Cool down with a cool shower.
  • Cover all exposed skin with an SPF sunscreen (15 or above) and wear a wide-brimmed hat to protect your face and head.
  • Pay special attention to the elderly, the very young and anyone with a pre-existing medical condition.
  • Check in on older neighbors, family and friends at least twice a day.

FACTS ABOUT HEAT ILLNESS:

  • Heat illness is serious. Prolonged exposure to the heat is potentially fatal and can aggravate heart or lung disease.
  • The risk for getting sick during a heat wave is increased for people who:
    • Do not have or do not use air conditioning
    • Are ages 65 or older
    • Have chronic medical or mental health conditions
    • Take certain medications
    • Are confined to their beds, immobile, or are otherwise homebound
    • Are overweight
    • Consume alcohol or illegal drugs
  • If you or someone you know feels weak or faint, go to a cool place and drink water. If there is no improvement, call a doctor or 911.
  • Call 911 immediately if you have, or someone you know has:
    • Hot dry skin OR cold clammy skin
    • Trouble breathing
    • Rapid heartbeat
    • Confusion, disorientation, or dizziness
    • Nausea and vomiting

KEEPING YOUR PETS SAFE:

  • Avoid dehydration: Pets can dehydrate quickly, so give them plenty of fresh, clean water.
    Exercise early and late: When the temperature is very high, don’t let your dog linger on hot asphalt. Your pet’s body can heat up quickly, and sensitive paw pads can burn.
  • Know when your pet is in danger: Symptoms of overheating in pets include excessive panting or difficulty breathing, increased heart and respiratory rate, drooling, mild weakness, stupor, or even collapse.
  • Animals with flat faces like Pugs and Persian cats are more susceptible to heat stroke since they cannot pant as effectively. They should be kept cool in air-conditioned rooms as much as possible.
  • Never leave a pet inside of a parked car on a hot day, even with the windows open.
    Keep cats safe by installing screens in your windows.
  • Prepare for your pet: Pet food, water, medications and supplies should always be part of your emergency preparedness and “go bags.”

ENERGY-SAVING TIPS:

During periods of intense electrical usage, such as on hot, humid days, it is important to conserve energy as much as possible to avoid brownouts and electrical disruptions. A few important energy-saving tips include:

  • Set air conditioners at 78°. A 75° setting uses 18 percent more electricity and a 72° setting uses 39 percent more electricity. This setting allows for sufficient cooling while still conserving electrical power.
  • Use an air conditioner only when home. If you want to cool your home before you arrive, use a timer to have it come on half an hour before you arrive.
  • Don’t air-condition an empty room.
  • Identify any potential air leaks that may be causing increased energy expenditure. Use caulk, weather stripping or other weather guarding solutions to plug any possible leaks.
  • If you have central air, block the vents in unoccupied rooms
  • Clean or replace your air conditioner filters at least once a month during the cooling season.
  • Use fans whenever possible. They use less energy than air conditioners and often work just as well.
  • Alternate your usage between air conditioners and fans. Once you’re cool and comfortable, shut down the air conditioner and turn on the fan. Alternating devices can cut air conditioner use by up to 40%, conserve energy and cut costs.
  • Replacing traditional light switches with dimmers or motion sensors is an easy way to moderate usage.
  • If you’re not using your electronics or appliances, unplug them.
  • About 40% of unwanted heat comes in through your windows. Keep windows, drapes and shades closed during the day to help keep unwanted heat out of your home.
  • Make sure to buy the proper sized air conditioning unit. If your air conditioner is too large for the room it more frequently cycles on and off. Frequent cycling causes temperature to fluctuate creating an environment that is both less comfortable and less efficient.
  • In the summer months, use your washing machine, dryer and dishwasher early in the morning or late at night when the temperature is generally cooler.
  • More energy-saving tips can be found here.

Please consider sharing this information with friends, family and co-workers. Stay cool and stay safe!

In service,

Corey Johnson
Council Member, 3rd Council District

Events

Photos from the West Side Summit

May 17, 2016

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Will Rogers, PB District Committee Member and Council Member Corey Johnson

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Council Member Corey Johnson and Victoria Armas, Principal of City Knoll Middle School.

nadler

Congressman Jerrold Nadler. Photo by Emanuel Zbeda.

carmen

NYC Schools Chancellor Carmen Fariña. Photo by Emanuel Zbeda.

hoylman

State Senator Brad Hoylman. Photo by Emanuel Zbeda.

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Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer. Photo by Emanuel Zbeda.

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NYC Comptroller Scott Stringer. Photo by Emanuel Zbeda.

Brandon

Brandon Katz. Photo by Emanuel Zbeda.

Miguel

Miguel Pedraza-Cumba, Hudson Guild.  Photo by Emanuel Zbeda.

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Council Member Corey Johnson. Photo by Emanuel Zbeda.

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Jacob Tidwell. Photo by Emanuel Zbeda.

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Lowell Kern, Co-Chair, Waterfront, Parks & Environment Committee, CB4. Photo by Emanuel Zbeda.

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Christine Berthet, Co-Chair, Transportation Committee, CB4. Photo by Emanuel Zbeda.

Events

Villager: Pols put on a push to cap number of tour buses at 225 licenses

November 20, 2015

November 19, 2015

BY AMY RUSSO  |  The state Department of Transportation reports that the number of double-decker tour buses in New York City more than tripled, from 57 to 194, from 2003 to 2013.

Today, there are at least eight sightseeing bus companies that operate a total of 229 buses — with nine license plates pending. The number of buses was, even higher, 299 in September 2014.

Endangerment of pedestrians, pollution, crowded streets and excessive noise are just some of the complaints being raised by Manhattan politicians and locals against sightseeing tour buses throughout the city.

Repeated cases of tour buses injuring and even killing pedestrians have moved politicians to action. These included one accident last July when a bus struck a man at the intersection of West Fourth St. and Sixth Ave., pinning him under the vehicle and dragging him down the street for some distance.

In October, legislation was announced by Councilmember Margaret Chin and Borough President Gale Brewer to cap the number of tour bus licenses issued at 225. There are currently no laws regulating the number of tour bus licenses in Manhattan.

“Multiple tour buses piled up at curbs and near-empty tour buses cruising the streets have made it clear — we need to set ground rules for this industry,” Brewer said.

If it becomes law, the bill would prevent the city’s Department of Consumer Affairs from issuing new license plates to sightseeing buses unless the number of active plates is under 225. The bill would not prohibit existing licenses from being renewed or replaced. Any vehicle capable of seating at least eight passengers that hires and sells trips to tourist destinations is required to have a sightseeing bus license.

The proposal comes a few months after a bill was introduced last May, under the prime sponsorship of Councilmember Corey Johnson, mandating that tour bus operators submit their operating plans to D.C.A. when applying for a bus license, facilitating D.C.A.’s monitoring of tour bus traffic at any given time.

Johnson also supports the cap on tour buses.

“This bill will improve the quality of life for so many New Yorkers who are affected every day by the constant flow of tour buses through our streets,” Johnson said. “When we have too many of these buses in operation, residents are faced with excessive noise, air pollution, traffic congestion and serious pedestrian safety issues.”

Paul Leonard, a spokesperson for Chin, said, “We feel that there is a momentum behind this effort to propose a very reasonable cap. We are very confident this will become law.”

The bill is currently in the Council’s Committee on Consumer Affairs.

Meanwhile, local residents and politicians claim that the buses are often partially or completely empty, functioning more as mobile advertisements than tourist transportation. 

“Often nearly empty of tourists, these tour buses serve as rolling billboards for a captive audience of New Yorkers who are negatively affected by the noise, negative air quality and congestion the buses create,” said Chin. “Our legislation seeks to institute a better balance between accommodating tourism and ensuring the safety and well-being of residents in neighborhoods throughout our city.”

Opponents also claim the vehicles’ noise levels are not being effectively regulated.

“These buses not only cause traffic problems, but many of them fail to comply with the law requiring them to have sound-limiting devices,” said Leigh Behnke of the Broadway Residents Coalition.

Leonard echoed the same concerns, stating, “Despite legislation that was actually signed into law limiting use of loudspeakers…we are still getting complaints about noise coming from sightseeing tour buses.”

Regarding the instances of pedestrians being injured or worse by the lumbering buses, Leonard said, “Unfortunately, these tragedies occur and it just makes us more resolute in our efforts.”

Events

Streets Blog NYC: De Blasio Signs Bill Requiring Side Guards on 10,000 Trucks by 2024

June 17, 2015

By Stephen Miller

Mayor Bill de Blasio signed a bill yesterday requiring side guards on all large city trucks, and on private garbage trucks operating in New York City, by 2024. When a truck driver strikes someone with the side of the vehicle, the guards prevent people from getting crushed beneath the truck’s rear wheels. They have been proven to reduce deaths and serious injuries where they are used.

The side guards bill covers approximately 10,000 trucks that weigh more than 10,000 pounds, according to Council Member Corey Johnson, who sponsored the legislation. That breaks down to 4,500 vehicles in the city fleet, including approximately 2,700 Department of Sanitation vehicles, and 5,500 to 6,000 private trash haulers regulated by the Business Integrity Commission.

“[The Department of Citywide Administrative Services] has already begun installing side guards on over 200 city trucks already on the job,” de Blasio said yesterday. “This bill takes this effort to the next level to ensure that all city-owned trucks and commercial garbage trucks are outfitted.”

The eight-year timeline for the new law is intended to let DSNY phase in side guards by requiring them on all new vehicles, a less expensive option than retrofitting existing trucks. Private sanitation haulers, which have older fleets, will likely have to retrofit many of their vehicles to meet the 2024 deadline. The bill passed with the support of the National Waste and Recycling Association, an industry group.

“The best thing to do, of course, is to avoid crashes in the first place,” said Transportation Alternatives Executive Director Paul Steely White, “but these side guards are like airbags for pedestrians and cyclists.”

City Council Transportation Committee Chair Ydanis Rodriguez revived a push for side guards after cyclist Hoyt Jacobs was killed in Long Island City by a private trash truck driver making a right turn. “Should a side guard have been installed, Hoyt might be with us today,” Rodriguez said at the bill signing.

Trucks make up just 3.6 percent of vehicles on New York City streets, according to U.S. DOT, but are involved in 12.3 percent of pedestrian fatalities and 32 percent of bicyclist deaths. Side guards have a proven track record: After the United Kingdom required them in 1986, the fatality rate for pedestrians hit by the side of a truck dropped by 20 percent. The fatality rate for cyclists in similar crashes fell by 61 percent.

New York becomes the second large American city to require side guards on its city fleet, following Boston, which mandated them last year. Side guards are standard equipment on trucks in Europe, Brazil, Japan, and other nations. The U.S. federal government has yet to take action on the issue.

De Blasio also signed a bill from Council Member Margaret Chin requiring DOT to study bicycle and pedestrian safety on truck routes, including the impact of tolling policies on truck traffic, and a bill from Council Member Paul Vallone requiring a DOT study on truck route compliance.

Events, News

The Winning Participatory Budget Projects!

May 11, 2015

PB Logo

1. New Park for the Community, $200,000, 1342 votes

Transform the vacant lot on 20th Street into a new public park for the community. Project would go towards demolishing the former Department of Sanitation building and environmental clean up.

136 W. 20th St. (Chelsea)

 

2. Revitalization of Chelsea Waterside Park, $85,000, 758 votes

Chelsea has very limited green park space. The project would bring residents into this underused park by creating an interactive garden for local children, focusing on ethnobotany and native plants.

11th Ave. b/w W.22nd & W.24th (Chelsea)

3. Renovations for Jefferson Market Library, $500,000, 648 votes

Jefferson Market Library is one of the busiest libraries in Manhattan with up to 1,000 people visiting each week. Funding would go towards building a new bathroom in the lobby which is ADA-complaint.

425 Avenue of the Americas (West Village)

4. Bathroom Renovations for LAB School, $500,000, 594 votes

Students avoid current bathroom issues by waiting until after school and utilizing local restaurants. Project would renovate 2 student bathrooms on each floor and bathrooms adjacent to the cafeteria.

*The NYC School Construction Authority has agreed to provide funding to implement this project.

333 W. 17th St. (Chelsea)

5. Sidewalk Repair on West 26thStreet at Elliot-Chelsea Houses, $50,000, 578 votes

The sidewalk on West 26th Street between 9th and 10th Avenues is in desperate need of repair. It has become difficult to walk, push carriages and wheelchairs on the sidewalk.

Chelsea-Elliot Houses (Chelsea)

6. PS3 Library Renovations, $35,000, 533 votes

The library has not been renovated in over a decade. With the technological advances of the last decade, modernizing the library is important in meeting the educational needs of today’s students.

490 Hudson St. (West Village)

7. Raised Pedestrian Crosswalk in Hell’s Kitchen, $250,000, 532 votes

Help prevent further crashes, death and injuries for pedestrians by installing a speed table at a notoriously dangerous crosswalk at West 45th Street and 9th

West 45th St. and 9th Ave. (Hell’s Kitchen)

Events

Participatory Budgeting – April 11-19!

April 7, 2015

PB Logo

Dear Neighbors,

Will it be a new community composting station in Hell’s Kitchen, or will it be clocks at bus stops that provide waiting passengers with bus arrival times?

Or maybe it will be a new public park on 20th Street, or equipment upgrades at Downing Street Playground?

Starting this weekend, you decide. Participatory Budgeting is taking place April 11-19 in District 3. Below are the projects that will be on the ballot, as well as times and locations for voting. Click here to commit to vote!

Thank you,

Corey Johnson
Council Member, 3rd Council District

Ballot Items

Culture and Community Facilities
1. Cooling System for Muhlenberg Library
Cost: $500,000
Funding will replace the building’s HVAC cooling unit to ensure that the branch can continue to serve as a cool space in the summer months, which includes serving as an official NYC Cooling Center.

209 W. 23rd St. (Chelsea)

2. Renovations for Jefferson Market Library
Cost: $500,000
Jefferson Market Library is one of the busiest libraries in Manhattan with up to 1,000 people visiting each year. Funding would go towards building a new bathroom in the lobby which is ADA-complaint.
425 Avenue of the Americas (West Village)

Education
3. O. Henry Learning Campus Renovations
Cost: $290,000
Hudson Guild, Lab High School, Lab Middle School, and Museum School will benefit from new gym bleachers, gym scoreboard, and locker room bathroom
renovations.
333 W. 17th St. (Chelsea)

4. Bathroom Renovations at Lab School
Cost: $560,000
Students avoid current bathroom issues by waiting until after school and utilizing local restaurants. Project would renovate 2 student bathrooms on each floor and bathrooms adjacent to the cafeteria.
333 W. 17th St. (Chelsea)

5. Bathroom Renovations for P.S. 3
Cost: $100,000
Renovation of existing bathroom facilities to promote a more sanitary environment for all students, faculty and school visitors.
490 Hudson St. (West Village)

6. P.S. 3 Library Renovations
$35,000
The library has not been renovated in over a decade. With the technological advances of the last decade, modernizing the library is important in meeting the educational needs of today’s students.
490 Hudson St. (West Village)

7. Public Address System Upgrade at Lab School
Cost: $500,000
Public Address (PA) system repair and upgrades to support the needs of three separate schools in the building, as well as building-wide announcements.
333 W. 17th St. (Chelsea)

Parks and Environment
8. New Park for the Community
Cost: $200,000
Transform the vacant lot on West 20th Street into a new public park for the community. Project would go towards demolishing the former Department of Sanitation building and environmental
clean up.
136 W. 20th St. (Chelsea)

9. Revitalization of Chelsea Waterside Park
Cost: $85,000
Chelsea has very limited green park space. The project would bring residents into this underused park by creating an interactive garden for local children, focusing on ethnobotany and native plants.
11th Ave. b/w W.22nd & W.24th (Chelsea)

10. Downing Playground and Fountain Upgrades
Cost: $200,000
Playground upgrades with new play equipment for children, as well as a safer, more child-friendly drinking fountain to replace the aging concrete structure that is currently falling apart.
1 Downing St. (West Village)

11. Community Composting Center
Cost: $35,000
A year-round solar-powered, forced air composting system for residents of Hell’s Kitchen. The center would have the capacity for at least two compost drop-off days a week.
(Hell’s Kitchen)
Parks and Recreation
12. New Soccer Turf Field at Fulton Houses
Cost:$500,000
New soccer turf, including physical safety and ball-strike safety fence or netting for neighboring window safety, marked field, and durable permanent mini goals.

Fulton Houses (Chelsea)

13. Resurfacing Sprinklers at Fulton Houses
Cost: $345,000
The toddler sprinkler area is used extensively by the children. The area needs to be excavated and resurfaced with the right materials so the children can continue to enjoy it and play safely.
Fulton Houses (Chelsea)

14. Upgrading Fulton Houses Basketball Court
Cost: $425,000
This project will offer all residents access to a modern basketball court. Court requires pavement to be leveled, drainage correction, proper landscaping and court markings.

Fulton Houses (Chelsea)

Streets, Sidewalks, and Transportation
15. Pedestrian Safety: Raised Crosswalks
Cost:$250,000
Help prevent further crashes, death and injuries for pedestrians by installing a speed table at a notoriously dangerous crosswalk at West 45th Street and 9th
Avenue.
West 45th St. and 9th Ave. (Hell’s Kitchen)

16. Bus Time Clocks for the M11 & M12
Cost: $200,000
Installation of bus time clocks that will provide waiting passengers with time information and bus arrival times.
(Along the M11 and M12 Routes)

17. Sidewalk Repair/Replacement
Cost:$50,000
The sidewalk on West 26th Street between 9th and 10th Avenues is in desperate need of repair. It has become difficult to walk, push carriages and wheelchairs on the sidewalk.
Chelsea-Elliot Houses (Chelsea)

 

Where to Vote

 

Date Time Location Address
Sat 4/11 – Sun 4/12 9a-5:30p Hartley House 413 W 46th St
Sat 4/11 – Sun 4/12 9a-6p The Fulton Houses Tenants Association Office 419A West 17th St (btwn 9th and 10th Aves)
Sat 4/11 – Sun 4/12 9a-6p Tony Dapolito Recreation Center 1 Clarkson St
Sat 4/11 12:30-6p Andrew Heiskell Library 40 West 20th Street
Sun 4/12 9a-6p Hudson Guild 441 W 26th St
Mon 4/13 – Fri 4/17 10a-5p Council Member Corey Johnson’s Office 224 West 30th St, Suite 1206 (btwn 7th and 8th Aves)
Sat 4/18 – Sun 4/19 9a-5:30p Hartley House 413 W 46th St
Sat 4/18 – Sun 4/19 9a-6p The Fulton Houses Tenants Association Office 419A West 17th St (btwn 9th and 10th Aves)
Sat 4/18 – Sun 4/19 9a-6p The LGBT Community Center 208 W 13th St
Sat 4/18 – Sun 4/19 9a-6p Tony Dapolito Recreation Center 1 Clarkson St
Sat 4/18 12:30-6p Andrew Heiskell Library 40 West 20th Street
Sun 4/19 9a-6p Hudson Guild 441 W 26th St, New York, NY 10001